Performance benchmarks for the manager

I promised last week (here) to post a target table of content of this series of posts about performance benchmarks.

It is a quite long list of topics that I split in two main areas:

  • Topics that are relevant for everyone in the organization, labeled “for the manager”,
  • Topics that are of interest mostly for the technical people, labeled “for the operational people

Below you find the candidate subjects that I believe are of general interest.


1)   What is a performance benchmark

2)  Types of technical benchmark

  1.   The check mark benchmark
  2.   The confirmation benchmark
  3.   The industry standard benchmark
  4.   The valuable benchmark

3)  Organizational challenges to implement a valuable benchmark

  1.  The IT architecture perspective
  2.  The IT operations perspective
  3.  The CFO perspective
  4.  The CEO perspective

Next post will contain the list of technical subjects while the following ones will start to dig into each subject in the two lists in an orderly fashion.

As I wrote earlier: your feedback will be key in shaping how this will move forward. Feel free to comment here or to reach me directly.

Performance benchmarks

It is time for me to give back.

Dealing with performance benchmarks has occupied a fair share of my life from my early days in the computer world in the mid ’80s.

In the beginning it was mostly reading, with just a bit of writing, that today I would be ashamed of, in one of the early Italian BBS “newspaper” called “Corriere Telematico“.

At the time I could have never imagined that benchmarks would have a very large role in my career to the point that for about 8 years they even defined my job title.

Now, as I my transition into a new role is almost complete, it feels like the right time to write something about benchmarks that can help many people in the industry.


I recall reading in one of the paper magazines of my early days something along the lines of “benchmarks don’t lie, but liars do use benchmarks”. I believe it was on MCmicrocomputer but I can’t bet on this.

This bleak statement about benchmarks was true 30+ years ago and it’s still true now, but we should not throw the good away together with the bad: proper benchmarks were and still are useful tools for individuals and organizations alike.  It’s all about defining “proper” correctly in each context.

For a while, given the scarcity of published material on the subject, I was thinking of putting together a book, with the help of a friend of mine.

I fear I will not be able to put in all the time needed to complete it in a reasonable time frame and for this reason I decided to blog on the subject instead.

In the coming weeks (or months, I don’t know yet how this will work) I will share what I learned in many years as a source for anyone wanting to get closer to the holy grail of the “proper benchmark”.

I will be vendor and technology neutral, covering both the business and the technical sides.

Your feedback will be key in shaping how this will move forward.

In the next post I’ll share the target table of content of this series of posts.

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in this blog are my own, not the opinions of my current employer or the opinions of any of my former employers and might diverge from their current, past or future opinions on the subjects I discuss. 

The opinion expressed are not the opinions of any of the associations I was part of in the past or I am part of today.

All the content of this blog is mine: it can be freely quoted in academic papers and free publications as long as credit is provided and the content is linked, but can’t be included into any paid publication like books, e-books, web content behind a paywall or any money-generating media without prior written authorization.

I reserve the right to change my mind on any of the subjects I write about and the freedom to share or not to share my revised opinion.

While I take no responsibility for the comments made on my blog I reserve the right to delete any comment as I see appropriate without the obligation to provide an explanation of my action.

I provide credit to my sources to the best of my knowledge: I will be happy to revise and correct any quote and credit if notified.

While I share my experience (positive or otherwise) in full honesty your mileage may vary and what worked for me might not work for you: the readers are the sole responsible for taking or not taking any action or decision (financial or otherwise) based on what I write in this blog.

I am not making money out of this blog nor get free products or perks of any type associated with my blogging activity.

There is no conflict of interests between this blog and my work or financial activities.

I reserve the right to change the terms of this disclaimer at any time.

 

Google maps killed my earlier habit of blogging here about places and food

When I started this blog a fair share of the content related to my travel and food experiences around the world.

Formally blogging is, in my opinion, a fairly involved process to ensure not only the content is relevant, but also the writing is at least properly structured. This, together with the fact that blogging is not a job for me and I have other hobbies too, led me to write only for significant experiences rather than always.

The excitement of writing was drying up over time (it is easy to see in the posting history) when the mechanism to contribute to Google Maps became available.

Albeit reviews on Maps tend to be shorter and a bit “twitter-style” the mechanism to contribute them is so convenient that I ended up being much more active than I was before.

An added stimulus to keep writing there is the monthly feedback showing the level of visibility of my contributions: reviews on Google Maps have a visibility that this blog never reached nor was ever going to reach while keeping its nature of a small side project.

If you are interested in keeping up with my reviews you should be able to find them here

I the end Google Maps contributions might be considered the last nail in the coffin of my writing, but I rather like to look at them just like an evolution of it and a greater value for the community than the earlier model.